Water analysis

BACTERIAL ANALYSIS

What is it for?
This test determines whether the water is safe to drink, i.e., if it contains bacteria: total coliforms, atypical bacteria, E. coli, etc.

When should it be done?
The MDDELCC suggests conducting a bacterial analysis twice a year, in the autumn and spring, when there is a greater risk of contamination. All well owners (artesian and shallow) should at least conduct one bacterial analysis, but a more comprehensive test is recommended: the new well test.

PHYSICOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS

What is it for?
This test determines the water’s physical and chemical contaminant content (e.g., iron, manganese, water hardness, TDS, tannins, PH, etc.)

When should it be done?
For artesian or shallow well owners who have never done so, this analysis should be carried out any time. The MDDELCC suggests conducting a physicochemical analysis at least once during the well’s useful life. This analysis is very important if you notice a change in your drinking water (smell, taste, color, etc.).

NEW WELL TEST

What is it for?
The new well test is the most comprehensive test for owners of a new well (artesian or shallow). This test includes a bacterial analysis and a complete physicochemical analysis.

When should it be done?
The MDDELCC strongly recommends that everyone who owns a new well conduct this complete test to make sure there are no harmful contaminants in their drinking water. This analysis is also very important if you notice a change in your drinking water (smell, taste, color, etc.).

OTHER TESTS

We perform a variety of other tests:

  • Dual bacterial and physicochemical analyses
  • Complete physicochemical test
  • Inorganic analysis of 13 substances
  • Laboratory arsenic analysis
  • Bathing water analysis
  • Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes hydrocarbon analysis
  • Inorganic analysis of free residual chlorine
  • C-10 to C-50 hydrocarbon analysis
  • Long chemical analysis
  • Inorganic nitrate and nitrite analysis
  • Inorganic PH analysis
  • Organic analysis of total THMs
  • Inorganic turbidity analysis